Press release. Asking NASA. (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD.)


Press release. Asking NASA (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD.)

Nov. 9, 2015. NASA Holds Media Briefing on Carbon’s Role in Earth’s Future Climate.

NASA has hosted a media teleconference at noon EST on Thursday, Nov. 12 to discuss the latest insights into how Earth is responding to rising levels of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, and what this means for our future climate.

Their press release described it as a NASA briefing presenting new observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission, NASA’s first satellite dedicated to measuring carbon dioxide, and preview field work planned in the North Atlantic and Alaska.

In this press release it is pointed out that: “Earth’s land and ocean currently absorb about half of all carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, but it’s uncertain whether the planet can keep this up in the future. NASA’s Earth science program works to improve our understanding of how carbon absorption and emission processes work in nature and how they could change in a warming world with increasing levels of carbon dioxide and methane emissions from human activities.”

The panellists presented were:

  • Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division at the agency’s headquarters in Washington
  • Mike Behrenfeld, principal investigator for NASA’s NAAMES field campaign, Oregon State University in Corvallis
  • George Hurtt, lead for NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System, University of Maryland in College Park
  • Annmarie Eldering, deputy project scientist for NASA’s OCO-2 mission at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California
  • Lesley Ott, research scientist in the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland

Ask NASA

I got the news late so I could not enjoy this opportunity to listen their assessments live.

In order to participate, it was addressed that media should have emailed their name and affiliation to Steve Cole at stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov by 11 a.m. on Thursday. Media and the public also could ask questions during the briefing on Twitter.

Since I was late I could not send my questions on time. Instead, I left some as a comment in the NASA group at LinkedIn and also a question on Twitter. I am not sure if I will have feedback on my questions, so I am going to leave them here, outdoors (at least out of my head). In that way, any of you reading this lines might want to engage sharing your thoughts.

This is what I wrote at LinkedIn:

Nice to know but I got it late. I would have made two questions, should we consider our planetary climatic dynamics to be driven sorely by thermodynamics independently from the interaction from biological processes? and, When looking at planets with optimal conditions for colonization, would it be considered acceptable a planet with an increasing rate of CO2 conc. as we see in the present times in our planet?

On twitter, limited to 140 characters

Nice initiative, how far interfering with biological processes could affect our planetary climatic dynamics?

Last comment

I have seen that many people wonder on why CO2 concentrate in the North Hemisphere. The location for the majority and strongest sources of emissions happens inland. The distribution of land surface and the economy supporting industrial activities, as well as the majority of the population of the planet, are concentrated in the North Hemisphere. Similar as with cholesterol, or electricity if you see a satellite image at night.

Also, the global atmospheric circulation is divided in two by the equator, NH and SH due to Coriolis effect. Consequently, the gasses carried move towards the Arctic in the North Hemisphere and to the Antarctic in the South at tropospheric level.

If you wonder why do I choose those questions, I can not expect for you to know my previous publication in the subject but I would point to at least one here .

“Are thermodynamics defining the state which allow life to evolve in a changing climate? or, Are biotic systems which develop against thermodynamic fluctuations taming the weather?”

A lesson learnt by humanity was to accept that every component in our universe influence each other. Still to be understood is what type of influence do we play. I am amazed that such consideration can be neglected for so many based on the amusing size of other forces. In the magnitude of the whole universe we might be as influencing as children in a economic crisis. But in our close universe, the repercussion from our capacity to transform our environment has an influence similar as of bacteria in the transformation of a planetary thermodynamic system. Interactions from “small” parties can drive the tipping point of universal forces interacting.

—- xxx —-

(This post is part of a more complex piece of independent research. I don´t have founding, political agenda or publishing revenues from visits. Any scientist working in disciplines related with the topics that I treat in my blog knows how to judge the contribution that my work could potentially add to the state of knowledge. Since I am in transition looking for a position in research, if you are one of those scientists, by just acknowledging any value you might see from my contribution, would not only make justice to my effort as independent researcher, but ultimately, it will help me to enhance my chances to find a position with resources to further develop my work.

I believe that the hypothesis that I have presented in previous posts in this blog (here,here and here) could help to understand present and possible future scenarios in atmospheric circulation. However, this is an assessment based on observation which needs to be validated throughout open discussion and data gathering. So please feel free to incorporate your thoughts and comments in a constructive manner.

If you feel like sharing this post I would appreciate to have a reference about the place or platform, by private or public message, in order for me to have the opportunity to join the debate and be aware of the repercussion which might generate d.fdezsevilla(at)gmail.com)

For anybody interested in the posts related with this discussion here I leave you those more relevant in chronological order (there are comments bellow some of them. Please check them out):

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About Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD.

Citing This Site "Title", published online "Month"+"Year", retrieved on "Month""Day", "Year" from http://www.diegofdezsevilla.wordpress.com. By Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD. More guidance on citing this web as a source can be found at NASA webpage: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/bibliography/citations#! DOIs can be generated on demand by request at email: d.fdezsevilla(at)gmail.com for those publications missing at the ResearchGate profile vinculated with this project. **Author´s profile: Born in 1974. Bachelor in General Biology, Masters degree "Licenciado" in Environmental Sciences (2001, Spain). PhD in Aerobiology (2007, UK). Lived, acquired training and worked in Spain, UK, Germany and Poland. I have shared the outcome from my work previous to 2013 as scientific speaker in events held in those countries as well as in Switzerland and Finland. After 12 years performing research and working in institutions linked with environmental research and management, in 2013 I found myself in a period of transition searching for a new position or funding to support my own line of research. In the current competitive scenario, in order to demonstrate my capacities instead of just moving my cv waiting for my next opportunity to arrive, I decided to invest my energy and time in opening my own line of research sharing it in this blog. In March 2017 the budget reserved for this project has ended and its weekly basis time frame discontinued until new forms of economic and/or institutional support are incorporated into the project. The value of the data and the original nature of the research presented in this platform and at LinkedIn has proved to be worthy of consideration by the scientific community as well as for publication in scientific journals. However, without a position as member of an institution, it becomes very challenging to be published. I hope that this handicap do not overshadow the value of my achievements and that the Intellectual Property Rights generated with the license of attribution attached are respected and considered by the scientist involved in similar lines of research. **Any comment and feedback aimed to be constructive is welcome as well as any approach exploring professional opportunities to be part of.** In this blog I publish pieces of research focused on addressing relevant environmental questions. Furthermore, I try to break the barrier that academic publications very often offer isolating scientific findings from the general public. In that way I address those topics which I am familiar with, thanks to my training in environmental research, making them available throughout my posts. (see "Framework and Timeline" for a complete index). At this moment, 2017, I am living in Spain with no affiliation attachments. Free to relocate geographically worldwide. If you feel that I could be a contribution to your institution, team and projects don´t hesitate in contact me at d.fdezsevilla (at) gmail.com or consult my profile at LinkedIn, ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Also, I'd appreciate information about any opportunity that you might know and believe it could match with my aptitudes. The conclusions and ideas expressed in each post as part of my own creativity are part of my Intellectual Portfolio and are protected by Intellectual Property Laws. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial conditions. In citing my work from this website, be sure to include the date of access. (c)Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD, 2017. Filling in or Finding Out the gaps around. Publication accessed 20YY-MM-DD at https://diegofdezsevilla.wordpress.com/
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65 Responses to Press release. Asking NASA. (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD.)

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