Climate, “normal variability” or “change”? (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla)


Climate, “normal variability” or “change”? (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla)

About “normal variability” or “change”, I don´t like to characterize the grade of perturbation of any situation if it has not been defined its stable state first. Variability and change comes within any natural process and I believe sometimes we are limited by our capability to see further than our perceptive limitations to understand how things work in our natural environment. However, I would not be surprised if the grade of perturbation generated by the Human specie development in the global ecosystem (water cycles, land use and cover, global energy balance displacement, alterations in the biota regeneration cycles and biodiversity, displacement of natural resources part of soil regeneration, land features alteration in migration routes, …) triggers reactions in the environment at global scale… would that be out of the plausible?

If we consider our atmosphere as the rechargeable battery that keeps our ecosystem running and that at the same time is getting recharged by the ecosystem functionality in itself, how much perturbation can adsorb the rechargeable cycle until both parts get compromised?

From an environmental point of view I understand that any ecosystem has a limited capacity to absorb perturbations. So, from an hypothetical approach to the subject on human impact versus environmental change I would like to see a case scenario study giving answer to three questions: Could humans alter the ecosystem at global scale? Which part of the ecosystem (soil, atmosphere, light and heat (from our sun), water or living organisms) would reflect primary the impact from human perturbation? What would have to do humans to alter the ecosystem at global scale? In case the answer is “yes” to the first question, how much of the answer for the second and third questions matches with actual facts?

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About Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD.

Citing This Site "Title", published online "Month"+"Year", retrieved on "Month""Day", "Year" from http://www.diegofdezsevilla.wordpress.com. By Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD. More guidance on citing this web as a source can be found at NASA webpage: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/bibliography/citations#! Bachelor in General Biology, Masters degree "Licenciado" in Environmental Sciences (2001, Spain). PhD in Aerobiology (2007, UK). Lived, acquired training and worked in Spain, UK, Germany and Poland. I have shared the outcome from my previous work as scientific speaker in events held in those countries as well as in Switzerland and Finland. After couple of years performing research and working in institutions linked with environmental research and management, I find myself in a period of transition searching for a new position or funding to support my research. In the present competitive scenario, instead of just moving my cv and wait for my next opportunity to arrive, I have decided to invest also my energy and time in opening my own line of research showing what I am capable of. The value of the data and the original nature of the research presented in this blog has proved to be worthy of consideration by the scientific community as well as for publication in scientific journals. However, without a position as member of an institution, it becomes very challenging to be published. I hope that this handicap do not overshadow the value of my work and the intellectual rights represented by the license of attribution attached are respected and considered by the scientist involved in this line of research. Any comment and feedback aimed to be constructive is welcome. In this blog I publish pieces of research focused on addressing relevant environmental questions. Furthermore, I try to break the barrier that academic publications very often offer isolating scientific findings from the general public. In that way I address those topics which I am familiar with, thanks to my training in environmental research, making them available throughout my posts. (see "Framework and Timeline" for a complete index). At this moment, 2017, I am living in Spain with no affiliation attachments. Free to relocate geographically worldwide. If you feel that I could be a contribution to your institution, team and projects don´t hesitate in contact me at d.fdezsevilla (at) gmail.com or consult my profile at LinkedIn, ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Also, I'd appreciate information about any opportunity that you might know and believe it could match with my aptitudes. The conclusions and ideas expressed in each post as part of my own creativity are part of my Intellectual Portfolio and are protected by Intellectual Property Laws. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial conditions. In citing my work from this website, be sure to include the date of access. (c)Diego Fdez-Sevilla, PhD, 2016. Filling in or Finding Out the gaps around. Publication accessed 20YY-MM-DD at http://www.diegofdezsevilla.wordpress.com/
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4 Responses to Climate, “normal variability” or “change”? (by Diego Fdez-Sevilla)

  1. Pingback: Resilience in our environment. | diego fdez-sevilla

  2. Pingback: Exploring the effects of humanly generated factors in the role played by Solar activity in the climate. | diego fdez-sevilla

  3. From “NASA Science Earth. Big Questions.”
    How is the global earth system changing?
    Earth is currently in a period of warming. Over the last century, Earth’s average temperature rose about 1.1°F (0.6°C). In the last two decades, the rate of our world’s warming accelerated and scientists predict that the globe will continue to warm over the course of the 21st century. Is this warming trend a reason for concern? After all, our world has witnessed extreme warm periods before, such as during the time of the dinosaurs. Earth has also seen numerous ice ages on roughly 11,000-year cycles for at least the last million years. So, change is perhaps the only constant in Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history.
    Scientists note that there are two new and different twists to today’s changing climate: (1) The globe is warming at a faster rate than it ever has before; and (2) Humans are the main reason Earth is warming. Since the industrial revolution, which began in the mid-1800s, humans have attained the magnitude of a geological force in terms of our ability to change Earth’s environment and impact its climate system.
    Since 1900, human population doubled and then doubled again. Today more than 6.5 billion people inhabit our world. By burning increasing amounts of coal and oil, we drove up carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere by 30 percent. Carbon dioxide is a “greenhouse gas” that traps warmth near the surface.
    Humans are also affecting Earth’s climate system in other ways. For example, we transformed roughly 40 percent of Earth’s habitable land surface to make way for our crop fields, cities, roads, livestock pastures, etc. We also released particulate pollution (called “aerosols”) into the atmosphere. Changing the surface and introducing aerosols into the atmosphere can both increase and reduce cloud cover. Thus, in addition to driving up average global temperature, humans are also influencing rainfall and drought patterns around the world. While scientists have solid evidence of such human influence, more data and research are needed to better understand and quantify our impact on our world’s climate system.
    http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/big-questions/is-the-global-earth-system-changing-and-what-are-the-consequences/

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  4. Pingback: Following the steps of water vapour in climatic events (By Diego Fdez-Sevilla) | diego fdez-sevilla

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